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ARTHUR G. PYLE 



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CHARLES BAGNALL 




JOHN W. PACKARD 




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JOHN PACHECO 




CARLO GUIDABONI 




JOHN H. WALKER 



^Jke staff is proud to dedicate this uears issue 
of -Jill victoru ' to the members of the facuitu 
sewina in the firmed _y < 



now 



orces. 









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cJtll Victory 

Editqr-in-chief Barbara Hall 

Literary Editor Mary Lea Pioppi 

Business Manager Robert Silva 

. Hilda Belcher 



Asst. Business Managers 



Sales Promotion 
Art Editor 
Asst. Art Editor 
School News 
Alumni 
Girls' Sports . 



Enzo Monti 

Charles Matthewson 

Robert Bastoni 

. Dorothy Durant 

Mary-Allen Manion 

. Norma Anderson 

Margaret Donovan 

Ann Dugan 



Boys' Sports Roy Randall 

. Althea St. Onge 



Senior Features — Robert Hutchinson, Chairman 



Senior Poems — Mary Reed, Chairman 



Candid Camera 



Typists 



Junior Literary Editor 
Sophomore Literary Editor 
Musicolumn .... 



. Marjorie Knight 

William Di Stefano 

Barbara Holmes 

Joseph Quinlan 
Patricia Dugan 
. Ruth Vickery 
. Ruth Gordan 
Eleanor Ruffini 
Mary Roderick 

. Sumner Stratton 
Elston Bartlett 

Margaret Brewster 
. Lois Caswell 

Marjorie Radcliffe 

Pauline Armstrong 
. Elaine Girard 



l^ubiiiked oh Ike 
umouln ^Mian S^ckoot 
J-^lumoulk, re I aii. 





THE PRICE OF PEACE 



DEACE is an ideal never yet fully attained by 
any man or any nation ; nor will it be attained 
ever by the world — fully. Peace as mankind know? 
it is a compromise, a whole series or even a sys- 
tem of compromises. In a world of conflicting in- 
terests and ambitions, in a world in which nations 
grow, peace must be elastic. Any peace designed 
primarily to preserve the status quo bears too 
close a resemblance to the peace of death to be of 
use to a living world. 

Peace is indivisible. If it is broken anywhere, 
it is likely to break everywhere. We can no longer 
speak — as we tried to just a few years ago — of "localizing" a war. The 
peace of China and of Ethopia is our peace, too. The world has become 
one; the instruments of peace and the weapons of war both have made it 
one — physically. Mankind, longing for peace, must make it one in spirit. 

What does one pay for peace? This most precious of all commodities 
can be purchased with one mintage only — life. And it is not purchased 
on the field of battle; we buy there merely the hope of peace. Nor is it 
to be bought at the conference table when war ends; there we take on 
the responsibility to make peace effective. No more than that. 

But we buy peace in our daily lives with our lives — the lives of the 
living, not the dead. — all our lives long. And, when we die, those who 
come after us must continue to pay this price if peace is to continue. 
Peace must be waged as sternly and unrelentingly as war is waged. 

For peace is dynamic, vital ; not a mere negation — the absence of war. 
Having paid in "blood and sweat and tears" for the hope of peace, and 
having added to that such vast material wealth, we must still stand ready 
to pay in work and worry, in sacrifice and selflessness the further exactions 
demanded of us. 

And the price will not be too high. 

Day by day, aware of our own interests, firm in our faith in de- 
mocracy, loyal to our own ideals, yet never blind to the interests and faith 
and ideals of other peoples, we must be patient, resolute, just — and, as 
we have always been, a peace-loving people. 

And we must be awake — as we have not always been. 

Edgar J. Mongan 

Page 5 



O-Jioaraph 



arapi 



ica 




President 



JOSEPH DIETLIN 



In spite of the fact that Joseph is the "strong, silent 
type", we realized his true worth and elected him our 
class president. "Camy" began his high school career 
inconspicuously, but in his Junior year he was chosen 
class treasurer. He served on various dance committees, 
and became a war stamp collector. Joseph is endowed 
with a contagious smile, a democratic spirit, blond hair, 
blue eyes, and a stature of 5' 11". He seems to enjoy 
being an executive, and does not appear to worry about graduation and 
speechmaking. He could succeed in the cinema, but would also make a 
dashing soldier, sailor, or marine. 




Vice-President 



ROY RANDALL 



Although a participant in many activities, we have yet to hear him 
refuse whenever an additional task is requested. With his ability and his 
cooperative spirit, we feel that he is capable of achieving much. Roy has 
proved his worth in many ways ; as co-captain of the 
football team, member of the basketball team, as presi- 
dent of the S. A. S., as a member of the National Honor 
Society, the Honor Group, and an editor on the Year 
Book staff. He has brown hair, blue eyes, a height of 5' 8", 
and is the proud owner of a green and red coupe, fre- 
quently used to transport football, basketball, and hockey 
players. We have confidence in this class executive. 




Page 6 



Secretary 
ANN DUGAN 



Some say she is quiet, but "quiet" is not the word 
to describe her. Ann is one of our very active girls who 
participated in basketball and hockey. She has strongly 
voiced the opinion that girls' sports are as important as 
those the boys engage in. She has distinguished herself 
as a member of the S. A. S., the Glee Club, and the Honor 
Group. She was a member of the Junior Press Club, 
and served on the "Till Victory" and Library Staffs. 

She has a radiant smile, long eyelashes, and dark, lustrous hair. Our 

Ann is definitely nice to know. 




Treasurer 

RICHARD BALBONI 
NORMAN FABRI 



Richard Balboni, an active member of the football team and treasurer 
of the class for the first half year, is now in the United States Army Air 
Corps. Norman Fabri was chosen to fill the vacancy occasioned by his 
departure. "Dimples" has demonstrated his efficiency as a member of the 
football squad, and as a member of various dance com- 
mittees. Norman also portrayed "Joseph" in the Christ- 
mas play. He can be found almost any afternoon labor- 
ing in the First National Store, where he collects precious 
red ration points in the meat ( ?) department. What about 
a thick juicy steak, Norman? He could easily be described 
as tall, dark, and handsome. We are fortunate in having 
one so capable to care for our class funds. 




Page 7 



/ 







f&ih's Quest 

Auouth had climbed to the mountain top 
In search of the path of lite 
That leads to success and happiness 
f trough ui5cJom and courage and strife. 
Ihe world spread wide before him 
torn tne great height uhero he stood 
Vah the guiding hand ot his elders 
directing the uau through lire's wood. 



The goal he desired was a world at peace 
Vith Tibertu , 'justice, pood will — 
His debt to God and his fellow men 
He must honestlu seefv to fulfill. 
2 He reabed it must be his purpose 
To spurn evil and follow the truth 
That will lead to new heights or perfection 
In this land, the clear dream or his uouth. 



Then he praued that the vision he had here 
Would staii when his ioumeii must start 
Down the mountain and out on lifes hionwau 
t/here alone he must tar\e up his part. 

Rujh Gordoa 

J) Tjuronl 



r/o record here of tkinas tneu 'ue done; 
'e only seek to nave Some fun. 



JOHN AGNONE 

He's the genial boy who cleans 

the boards, 
Apparently never vexed, 
For as soon as he's scrubbed 

off one test 
Mrs. R is there with the next. 



NORMA ANDERSON 

A senior boy is the obvious 

choice. 
The idea has been flouted: 
By overt acts she's shown us 
That she, for one, can doubt it. 



DORIS ARMSTRONG 

We all know where Doris is 
When Period II arrives; 
She labors on attendance 

slips — 
It's work on which she thrives. 



RICHARD BALBONI 

Dick served us as class treas- 
urer 

For half a year or more — 

Now we're further in his 
debt : 

He's in the Flying Corps. 



ROBERT BASTONI 

A metamorphosis we've seen, 
And the change we don't de- 
, cry : 
Gone is the bashful boy we 

knew 
In the days of Junior High. 




AtfcA 




EVELYN BATES 

Evelyn is not boisterous, 
We know the reason why: 
It's because she's thinking, 
Not because she's shy. 



BETTY BEARHOPE 

It would prove most lucrative 
Were she to take a chance 
On collecting small donations 
When instructing in the 
dance. 



MARY BETTENCOURT 

She won't subscribe to gam- 
bling 
Whatever may befall; 
By legimate endeavor 
She'll win — or not at all. 



VIOLA BLACK 

Her position is strategic: 
When she feels less than fine, 
A doctor 'd treat his typist — 
And she needn't stand in line. 



GLORIA BOTIERI 

A secretary's life she thinks 
In pleasure must abound; 
If we were boss, we'd happy 

be 
To have this girl around. 



Page 9 



DWIGHT BOUDREAU 

The Navy he felt 
He had to join 
No matter from us 
What hours he'd purloin. 



ROBERT BRENNER 

"Join the Navy and see the 

world!" 
No recruiting poster's needed 
To sell the idea to this boy — 
The point he has conceded. 



JESSIE BREWER 

She may not have the blondest 

hair 
Of any girl alive, 
But undoubtedly she has it 
In the Class of '45. 



MARGARET BREWSTER 

She would a secretary be, 
And she should be a good one; 
For, when she's given work 

to do, 
It never is just half done. 



BETSEY BUMPUS 

She's one of the few good 
knitters 

The senior class can boast; 

When the Rsd Cross yarn ar- 
rives 

Is the time we need her most. 



DELIA CADORETTE 

Before she wore a diamond 
We know that she desired 
To be a cosmetician: 
The wish may have expired. 



Page 10 




JOANNE CALZOLARI 

Mrs. Raymond finds her 
Most efficient — 
As home room secretary 
She's omniscient. 



RICHARD CAPOZUCCA 

He won't rush in foolishly 
Where angels fear to tread ; 
He knows to travel safe and 

far 
A man must use his head. 



LOIS CASWELL 

Handling ration books, we've 

heard, 
Can drive some people mad : 
But she's exposed to them all 

day — 
And finds the job not bad. 



WALTER CHILDS 

The urge to hike throughout 

the land 
Is difficult to smother — 
His shot gun in his good right 

hand, 
His camera in the other. 



ROBERT COMMEAU 

Two hundred model airplanes 
He made before he went; 
'Twould seem that in the Air 

Corps 
He should be quite content. 



EDITH COPPAGE 

When she brings us 
Liszt and Gevaert, 
We experience 
Moments rare. 



MARY CORREIO 

In these very hectic days 

With housewives in a quan- 
dary 

She should make her dream 
come true — 

Establish her hand laundry. 



GLORIA COSTA 

When we asked her to play 
Mary 

At the Christmas season, 

The choice was not hap- 
hazard — 

There was a special reason. 



BARBARA DEARBORN 

We close our eyes and see her 
In a radio station 
Singing with a name band — 
Wild the acclamation. 



HARRIET DeFELICE 

Harriet is the tonic 
We take so we may bloom : 
Taken in proper doses 
She's the antidote to gloom. 



FRANCES DIEGOLI 

The bulletin board for Jan- 
uary 

She had to undertake: 

Not her fault if the quaran- 
tine 

Made the subject out of date. 



JOSEPH DIETLIN 

He really wants to graduate, 
And yet he dreads the minute 
When he must face the multi- 
tude, 
Recall his speech, begin it. 




WILLIAM DiSTEFANO 

"Laugh and the world laughs 

with you" — 
He does — in horror we leap, 
For such a frightful groan he 

gives 
We feel we're meant to weep. 



MARGARET DONOVAN 

To Boston on Saturday morn- 
ing- 
She gayly wends her way; 
At a school of art she'll spend 
A. most inspiring day. 



ANN DUGAN 

We have heard a girl de- 
scribed 

As beautiful but dumb; 

But here is glamor and gram- 
mar: 

She's obviously not the one. 



PATRICIA DUGAN 

By qualms and squeams 
She's not beset; 
If one method won't work, 
Another she'll get. 



DOROTHY DURANT 

She's dedicated to her art. 
When lags the conversation, 
Her mind is on a loftier 

thing — 
The glcry of creation. 



RUTH ELLIS 

To Florida she did not go: 

We're dewy-eyed and tremu- 
lous; 

Could it be she wished to 
spend 

The entire year with us? 



Page 11 



NORMAN FABRI 

A fish, some meat, or frozen 

fruit 
He'll hand you with a smile: 
In school as in the grocery 

store 
He's pleasant all the while. 



BEVERLY FECI 

In the competition 
After schooldays looming 
She will be conspicuous 
For superior grooming. 



JOHN FILLEBROWN 

Astaire and Rogers 
Are a comely combination, 
And Johnnie and Winkie 
Are a perfect imitation. 



DORIS FILLION 

It's sheer curiosity 
We must admit, 
But the nickname, Mickey- 
Just how does it fit? 



ALVIN FORNACIARI 

Even his nickname 
Suggests that sport 
In which, come springtime, 
He'll cavort. 



DOROTHY FORNACIARI 

To study the piano 
Or soothe a fevered brow? 
A decision she must make 
Not very long from now. 



Page 12 




DAVID FOWLER 

He was to go to Middleboro, 
But he changed his mind; . 
We like to think it was be- 
cause 
For P. H. S. he pined. 



EILEEN GARUTI 

We've found her very helpful 
When we want a favor done; 
She's pleasant and coopera- 
tive, 
Yet seeks no place in the sun. 



LAURA GARUTI 

She served as head librarian: 
Our admiration won 
By creating the impression 
That work could be real fun. 



CHARLES GILBERT 

Every subject in his course 
He does not adore; 
But Period V and Radio — 
Who could ask for anything 



ELAINE GIRARD 

She thinks she'll do what her 

mother did : 
May she prosper in her 

choice! 
Four years from now the 

youth of the town 
May listen to her voice. 



RUTH GORDON 

The Beatrice Lillie of our 

stage? 
Her name on a marquee? 
Since her debut in November, 
We feel that this could be. 



1m- uti . ^ 



ALFRED GUERRA 

When he goes into service, 
He should make a bequest: 
His lovely jacket to the girl 
He deems above the rest. 



BARBARA HALL 

Her amazing appetite 
Cannot be denied; 
So numerous her activities 
It may be justified. 



DOROTHY HANSON 

When duty calls, she anwers; 
So gracious her compliance 
She puts to shame rebellious 

ones 
Who would show defiance. 



HARRY HANSON 

Track and trumpet 
Titivate him, 
No slouch at either 
We would rate him. 














BARBARA HOLMES 

Those who have a carping 

tongue 
Arouse her deepest ire; 
Those who prod and pester 
She holds but little higher. 



ROBERT HUTCHINSON 

A weekly trip to Kingston 
We can comprehend, 
But how he gets his car to run 
Puzzles us no end. 



JOHN IZZO 

He's engaged in a struggle 
Terrific and grim — 
Will he conquer English 
Or it vanquish him? 



BETTY JEWETT 

We don't know how she reacts 

To mastadon or mouse, 

But the cocker spaniel is the 

dog 
She'll have around her house. 



JEANNETTE HARDING 

Children here, children there, 

Children, children every- 
where — 

Not everyone would think it 
fun 

To prepare them for grade 
one. 





JOYCE KENNARD 

In Period I who's failed to see 
How she emulates the bee, 
Doing all a girl can do 
To meet detail tests in Period 
II? 



WILLARD HUNT 

He shuffled off from Buffalo 
In his Junior year; 
We hope we've made it evi- 
dent 
We're glad to have him here. 




EDWARD KEIRSTEAD 

He'd hate to live in a city, 
To work in a factory go: 
He would be close to the rich 

brown earth 
With a chance to watch things 

grow. 



Page 13 



MARJORIE KNIGHT 

Could be in basketball or 

hockey 
She rocketed to fame — 
But she beat all boys in news 

tests ! 
More honor to her name. 



CLAIRE LAMONTAGNE 

We don't know what aptitude? 
The B. U. tests revealed, 
But her interest really lies 
In the business field. 



DAVID LINDROS 

The class looked up and fol- 
lowed 

Miss Rafter's pleading look: 

She shook her head ; we heard 
her sigh, 

"Oh, David, close that book!" 



MARY ALLEN MANION 

"Seven Lively Arts" by Billy 

Rose 
On Broadway is presented: 
No more than two she needs 

to keep 
Her busy and contented. 



GEORGIA MARINOS 

We say this in 

No mood censorious, 

But our will against hers 

And she'd be victorious. 



HELEN MARINOS 

Foreign languages for some 
Provide a tortuous maze; 
They were for her a sunlit 

path 
Through her high school days. 



Page 1U 













x t¥ 




HERBERT MITCHELL 

After a gruelling week, he 

says, 
He will ask for naught 
But a chance to eat and a 

chance to sleep — 
And that's not demanding a 

lot. 



NANCY MONTANARI 

From a scientific viewpoint 
Our procedure couldn't be 

worse: 
Nancy simply looks like a girl 
Who would make a first-class 

nurse. 



BRUNO MONTALI 

In the crackle of the static 
In the hum of rectifier 
More than in the human voice 
He finds something to admire. 



LEVI MONTEIRO 

For Levi we were saving 
Our most potent jibes, 
But Uncle Sam protects him 
From our diatribes. 



RICHARD MORINI 

He owns the Car Distinctive: 
As he whizzes by, 
Numerals and nicknames 
Meet our startled eye. 



DOROTHY MOSKOS 

Dauntless is our Dorothy 
Dashing through the day, 
So much like a magnet 
We must "go her way". 



NANCY MURRAY 

She does not choose the spot- 
light, 

For she is quite content 

To do the task that lies at 
hand, 

Nor others' fame resent. 



ARLENE O'BRIEN 

When she leads the cheering 

squad, 
To her work she thrills: 
No need at all for her to think 
Of taking vitamin pills. 



ARLENE OTTANI 

She's not in the least pugna- 
cious, 

But everybody knows 

That no good purpose would 
be served 

By stepping on her toes. 



ALFRED PEARSON 

The value of the spoken word 
He thinks is overrated: 
When a thought must be ex- 
pressed, 
It should be briefly stated. 



BEVERLY PEDERZANI 

Not "for the duration," 
She'll sign up for life: 
She'll become a sailor's mate, 
An ever-loyal wife. 



PALMA PEDERZANI 

It isn't easy for many, 
And it isn't easy for her 
To admit that she is in error, 
To another's opinion defer. 




BELLA PEDRO 

Not in these very words per- 
haps, 

But inevitably she'll ask, 

"What was it that Miss Raf- 
ter gave 

For tomorrow's task?" 



JANET PERKINS 

She thought we wouldn't see 

them, 
But we did. How could she 

choose 
To dance a stately minuet 
In her saddle shoes? 



LOUIS PICARD 

His service in the State Guard 
May stand him in good stead. 
Prepared is he as boy can be 
For days that lie ahead. 



RUTH PIMENTAL 

She often seemed detached 
and cool 

When in trouble we have 
smarted ; 

Come, take the mask off, 
Ruthie, 

We know that you're soft- 
hearted. 



MARY PIOPPI 

Service to her school and class 
She's given in full measure; 
We hope that from it she will 

reap 
Fond memories to treasure. 



MARION PULSIFER 

Marion has a little lamb 
That gives her heart a thrill 
Romping o'er that little farm 
Down in Ellisville. 



Page 15 



JOSEPH QUINLAN 

He doesn't like to take the bus 
To Plymouth every day: 
We seek a helicopter 
His discomfort to allay. 



ROY RANDALL 

To read his football column 
We'd think he'd never played : 
Yet he was a co-captain, 
Resourceful, undismayed. 




ftfc 



BARBARA RAYMOND 

What goes on inside her head 

We only can suspect: 

Were we to question her, she'd 

give 
The answer most direct. 



MARY REED 

To know her is to like her: 
Wherever there is need 
She will lend a helping hand 
With no thought of meed. 



HARRY REZENDES 

We fear he secretly consigns 
To the deepest Tropics 
Any teacher who requires 
Detested oral topics. 



LORRAINE RICHARDS 

She has a host 
Of good intentions: 
Most prove to be more 
Than timely inventions. 



Page 16 




IVAN RICHMOND 

We need only look at Ivan 
To see that he could be 
Of service to a football team, 
And he was — in reality. 



LILLIAN RODERICK 

She's pleasant and obliging 
As she sets out teachers' 

trays, 
And she makes the lunch hour 

smoother 
[11 numerous little ways. 



MARY RODERICK 

Her word is as good as her 

bond. 
When she accepts a task, 
She attacks it with vim anJ 

vigor — 
What more could anyone ask? 



ALFREDA RONCARATI 

If she deems it 
Worth her while, 
She'll use her dimples 
To beguile. 



ELEANOR RUFFINI 

She doesn't work well under 

pressure, 
She won't be badgered a bit; 
She'll do a task well in her 

own good time, 
But she'll not be hurried a 

whit. 



JACQUELINE RYAN 

She's moderate by nature,- 
She holds herself aloof 
Be she the recipient 
Of praise or of reproof. 



MARY SALMI 

She will answer the Navy's 

call! 
She goes into training to find 
The way to ease the suffering 
Of the broken in body and 

mind. 





ELEANOR SAMPSON 

Dental office or kindergarten— 
Which place would be the 

finer? 
If the latter is her choice, 
The tiny will lead the tinier. 





NORMA SCOTTI 

To be able to smile 

In the depths of defeat 

Is not a test 

Most girls can meet. 






RICHARD SEARS 

Now Dick's a fine young 
radioman, 

For motors has a penchant; 

But when it comes to home- 
work, 

He is not so trenchant. 



ROSE SITTA 

She looked at her proofs 
And was frankly dismayed; 
But the pictures, when fin- 
ished, 
Her worst fears allayed. 







ROBERT SLADE 

So you'd win for yourself 
All the ladies' attention? 
Just learn to play swing 
Like a boy we won't mention. 





MARIE SOUTHWELL 

"Mirror, mirror on the wall, 
Who is the fairest of them 

all?" 
We ask you now, is it Marie? 
So much time she spends with 

thee. 



MARIO SPALLUZZI 

When a teacher's in the room, 
He's decorous as can be: 
But let her to the office go, 
A different boy is he. 



BARBARA STEVENS 

She may give it if you ask it; 
Otherwise she'll keep 
Her opinion to herself 
Locked in a silence deep. 



MARJORIE STEVENS 

Marjorie has her paint brush. 
What may we now expect? 
Deft'y with artistic strokes 
She'll get the right effect. 



ALTHEA ST. ONGE 

As meticulous in hockey 
As in an English test — 
Whenever she exerts herself, 
She does her level best. 



SUMNER STRATTON 

Give this boy a job to do 
And he'll do it at the double; 
It's only when he's idle 
That he gets into trouble. 



Page 17 



THELMA SYLVIA 

Thelma's voice, so sweet and 

low, 
Is one of Miss Wilber's woes; 
But she can speak in accents 

clear 
When she does it with her 

toes. 



FRANCIS TAVERNELLI 

With him it's axiomatic: 
From one's high school days 
Returns are in proportion 
To the effort one displays. 



BRADLEY TEXEIRA 

If only it were possible 

To spend the entire day 

1 n Aeronautics and M a - 

chines — 
Then work would turn to play. 



HILDA VALENTE 

Not given to outbursts 
Of grief or despair, 
Absorbed in her tasks — 
May she happily fare. 




RUTH VICKERY 

As treasurer of 305 

She more than rang the bell: 

Her room was first in the war 

bond drive 
And led stamp sales as well. 



EARL WALKER 

We think that he would be 

distrait 
Without his lassie fair, 
For anywhere we choose to go 
We're sure to see them there. 



BETTE WATTERSON 

She's a devotee 
Of Terpsichore: 
See Grecian Lore 
If you'd learn more. 



PEARL YOUNG 

Pearl goes around with her 
head in the clouds — 

To pilot a plane is her dream: 

If wishing a thing can make 
it come true, 

She's sure to come in on the 
beam. 



LAWRENCE SAVOY 

Happy are we that he wanted 
To do what he had to do; 
First he was of the seniors 
To don the Navy blue. 



Page 18 



i^iadd vvill and Jest 



amen 



t 



W/'E, the class of 1945, being of sound mind and body, although tempor- 
arily prostrated because of the over-zealous efforts of our teachers to 
impregnate us with knowledge, do declare this to be our last will and testa- 
ment and make the following bequests : 

To the Faculty : 

A method of releasing hungry boys from Room 303 at lunch hour 
without the usual stampede — for the benefit of Miss Iris Albertini. 

A miniature rocket ship in which Mrs. Helen Bagnall can spirit C. B. 
home so swiftly that his C. 0. will never notice his departure. 

A day (in the near future) when school buses will no longer be late 
— a boon to Mrs. Ruth Bailey. 

A girls' English Class that will produce better poetry than ours for 
Mrs. Louise Bearse. 

A method of protecting her embryo artists from dripping paint 
brushes — for Mrs. Margaret E. Brown. 

For Mrs. Viola Figueiredo, a book of recipes so foolproof that they 
will never fail, no matter what manner of boy may be attempting them. 

A squad as ingenious as ours in the art of girls' tumbling — for Mrs. 
Beatrice E. Garvin. 

A recording of "Don't Fence Me In" for Miss Beatrice Hunt, to be 
played whenever her groups need relaxation. 

A pasteurization plant to enable Miss Olive Hey to handle the product 
of the cow she was willed last year in order that she may obey the regula- 
tions of the Health Department. 

A hand-tooled leather folder in which Miss Jeannette Jacques may 
keep her notes on her experiences in France in the summer of '35. 

A pair of built-up shoes for Miss Helen C. Johnson so that she will 
not have to look up to her pupils. 

To Miss Lydia E. Judd, a group of students whose doodlings will 
bear a rather closer resemblance to shorthand than to Egyptian hiero- 
glyphics. 

A recording of her voice (made of pre-war material for durability) 
to be played each time Miss Elizabeth C. Kelly is about to say, "There 
will be absolutely no talking after 8:10." 

A sure-fire method of getting certain students to enjoy Problems 
of Democracy — for Miss Katherine J. Lang. 

An endless supply of pencils, blotters, and books for Miss Nellie R. 
Locklin so that she will never lack planes and edges for her solid demon- 
strations. 

Our sincere wishes for lasting happiness to Mrs. Marion Longever. 

To Mr. Edgar J. Mongan — the hope that he may soon be preparing 
his classes for peace rather than for war. 

A special permit to allow Mr. Theodore Packard to run his rebuilt 
gasoline motors. 

Page 19 



A class with such limitless knowledge of rivers, states, and capitals 
that Miss Amy Rafter may be overwhelmed with surprise. 

For Mrs. Miriam A. Raymond — A Features Editor who can keep her 
supplied with a considerable number of interesting and amusing columns 
to correct. 

Red and yellow striped shirts to relieve the monotony of his black 
and white referee's garb — for Mr. Mario J. Romano. 

To Mr. Louis Rudolph — the hope that he can find some one to replace 
"Dutch" Morini. 

A device that will catch rare, elusive biology specimens with the 
utmost dispatch — for Mr. Richard Smiley. 

A newspaper for Mrs. Alice Urann, in which she can edit her own 

"Advice to the Lovelorn" column. 

A group of pupils unusually interested in instrumental music — for 
Mrs. Amelia Vincent. 

An amplifying system which will enable even the most timid girl to 
be understood — for Miss Margie Wilber. 

A chemistry laboratory in a far corner of the school field, in which 
Mr. Claiborne H. Young can let his students manufacture whatever obnox- 
ious gases they please. 

To Next Year's Senior Class : 

The magnificent bequest of one (1) aspirin. 

One gallon of hi-test gasoline in order that there will be no trans- 
portation problem at its graduation dance. 

The privilege of having one more flight of stairs to climb each day. 

Our sincere hope that it may be the first class of peace. 

To Next Year's Junior Class: 

To the Chemistry division, R. H. leave ten liters of H2S. 

A pleasant experience in the nature of an introduction to the "Ninety 
Common Errors." 

A few enjoyable moments learning and writing Macbeth's dagger 
speech. 

Satisfaction from the realization that it, too, has advanced one more 
step toward the top. 

To the Football Team : 

A complete and elaborate first-aid kit to be presented to the boys 
after their annual clash with the girls' hockey team. 

To the Hockey Team : 

A type of oak stick that will not bend or deteriorate when brought 
into contact with the anatomy of the hardiest members of the football team. 
The Class of '45 has passed — 
Peace in Plymouth High at last! 

Composed and recorded by the humble servant of 
Class of 1945, 

Robert Hutchinson 

Page 20 



Name 


Nickname Pet Peeve 


John Agnone 


"J. A." 


Delia 


Norma Anderson 


Andy 


The Manomet bus 


Doris Armstrong 


Dot tie 


Coach Rudolph 


Richard Balboni 


Bal 


Cracking knuckles 


Robert Bastoni 


Horns 


Chowderheads 


Evelyn Bates 


Evie 


Scuffing feet 


Betty Bearhope 


Bearhug 


Weymouth High 


Mary Bettencourt 


Mimi 


Homelessons 


Viola Black 


Lola 


The Navy 


Gloria Botieri 


Glory 


Bookkeeping 


Dwight Boudreau 


Flash 


The Draft 


Robert Brenner 


Bin Chief 


Tardiness 


Jessie Brewer 


Ski 


Rising early 


Margaret Brewster 


Dolly 


Maggy 


Betsey Bumpus 


Bets 


Little brothers 


Delia Cadorette 


Del 


Writing poetry 


Joanne Calzolari 


Jo 


Del and Aud 


Richard Capozucca 


Cap 


Grouchy teachers 


Lois Caswell 


Lee 


First National boys 


Walter Childs 


Eggs 


Money 


Robert Commeau 


Bobby 


Clough's Market 


Edith Coppage 


Eadie 


Waiting 


Mary Correio 


Pee Wee 


Mice 


Gloria Costa 


Glory 


Jealous people 


Barbara Dearborn 


Bobby 


Harriet DeFelice 


Harriet DeFelice 


Babe 


Mispronunciation 


Frances Diegoli 


Cookie 


No mail today 


Joseph Dietlin 


Camy 


Mildred 


William Di Stefano 


Vatch 


Being kept waiting 


Margaret Donovan 


Peggy 


Ryan 


Ann Dugan 


Dixie 


Secretary's notes 


Patricia Dugan 


Giggles 


History III 


Dorothy Durant 


Dot 


Six o'clock 


Ruth Ellis 


Ruthie 


Waiting for M. A. M 


Norman Fabri 


Dimples 


Pat Dugan 


Beverly Feci 


Bev 


Tickling 


John Fillebrown 


Johnnie 


Gulf Station 


Doris Fillion 


Mickey 


Going to bed 


Alvin Fornaciari 


Hank 


Time Wasting 


Dorothy Fornaciari 


Dottie 


Dropping a comb 


David Fowler 


Dave 


Rising in the dark 


Eileen Garuti 


Lindy 


Blushing 


Laura Garuti 


Laurie 


Being called Laurie 


Charles Gilbert 


Gil 


History 


Elaine Girard 


Bugsy 


Swedes 


Ruth Gordon 


Ruthie 


Bubblegum 


Alfred Guerra 


Al 


Sleeping 


Barbara Hall 


Halbj 


Being called Babs 


Dorothy Hanson 


Peaches 


Being called Tomato 


Harry Hanson 


Hank 


Women 


Jeannette Harding 


Honey 


Waking up 


Barbara Holmes 


Holmsey 


Cross people 


Willard Hunt 


Willie 


Teachers 


Robert Hutchinson 


Brain 


Politicians 


John Izzo 


Nick 


Mr. Packard 


Elizabeth Jewett 


Bette 


Being called Lizzy 


Edward Keirstead 


Eddie 


English 



Happiest Moment When 

Eating 

With Wally 

Playing football 

In Angus' sweater 

In Period Four 

Without homework 

Raiding the ice box 

Doing what she likes 

Singing 

Listening to the radio 

With time and money 

He has a full tank 

Sailing 

Vacation arrives 

The mail arrives 

Dick gets home 

The boys get home 

The sun shines 

Her sailor is at home 

Traveling 

Eating 

Singing 

In Dreamland 

Driving 

Dick is at home 

Away from school 

Friends are happy 

Graduation is over 

With beautiful women 

Three in a model A 

Unnoticed in Latin 

Talking to Palma 

Sleeping 

Alone 

Out of Plymouth 

With Mickey 

Dancing with Winkie 

The mail arrives 

With no homelessons 

It's one-twenty 

Music's in the air 

Doing what she pleases 

Hearing Bing Crosby 

Out with Bernice 

In Problems of Democracy 

Without an English lesson 

In Jim's Lunch 

Eating 

Art calls 

Eating 

With Shep 

Everyone's happy 

Sleeping 

He graduates from M. I. T. 

He's working 

On vacation 

Sleeping 

Page 21 



Joyce Kennard 
Marjorie Knight 

Claire Lamontagne 
David Lindros 
Mary Allen Manion 
Georgia Marinos 
Helen Marinos 
Herbert Mitchell 
Bruno Montali 
Nancy Montanari 
Levi Monteiro 
Richard Morini 
Dorothy Moskos 

Agnes Murray 
Arlene O'Brien 
Arlene Ottani 
Alfred Pearson 
Beverly Pederzani 
Palma Pederzani 
Belmeda Pedro 
Janet Perkins 
Louis Picard 
Ruth Pimental 
Mary Lea Pioppi 
Marion Pulsifer 
Joseph Quinlan 
Royal Randall 
Barbara Raymond 
Mary Reed 
Harry Rezendes 
Lorraine Richards 
Ivan Richmond 
Lillian Roderick 
Mary Roderick 
Alfreda Roncarati 
Eleanor Ruffini 
Jacqueline Ryan 
Althea St. Onge 
Mary Salmi 
Eleanor Sampson 
Lawrence Savoy 
Norma Scotti 
Richard Sears 
Rose Sitta 
Robert Slade 
Marie Southwell 
Mario Spalluzzi 
Barbara Stevens 
Marjorie Stevens 
Sumner Stratton 
Thelma Sylvia 
Francis Tavernelli 
Hilda Valente 
Ruth Vickery 
Earl Walker 
Bette-Lee Watterson 
Pearl Young 

Page 22 



Joy 


Telephone calls 


Singing 


Midge 


Being reminded of her 






height 


On the hockey field 




Teasing people 


He's around 


Porkey 


Homework 


Sleeping 




Sub 


She gets the Mercury 


Georgie 


Rising mornings 


On her day off 


Rosie 


Being caught in the rain 


School marks are good 


Herky 


Smith's 


Sleeping 


Bull 


Dumb dames 


Working 


Nan 


Pat O'Brien's hair 


There are no homelessons 


Levy 


Physics 


Singing 


Dutch 


Moa Bing Bing Bing 


Playing football 


Dottie 


Being kidded about her 






walk 


He's around 


Nancy 


Homework 


At leisure 


Pat 


Being called Chubby 


She sees Dick 


Chassie 


Early rising 


Teased by her brother 


Fatty 


English 


Working 


Bev 


Rising at G:30 A. M. 


Paul's home 


Dugy 


Being called Alma 


She hears from Bob 


Bella 


Hurrying 


She's dancing 


Perky 


Being called Porky 


Eddie's around 


Louie 


Tacks in his seat 


In Packard's class 


Ruthie 


Punching tickets 


With a Junior 




Ball in the left gutter 


Without a Latin homelesson 


Pussy 


Jealousy 


Homework is done 


Quinny 


Rubbers 


Driving the Ford 


Roy 


Homework 


People push his car 


Bub 


Being tickled 


Participating in sports 


Polly 


Boys 


In Newton 


Raisins 


Catty girls 


Saturday morning comes 


Mousie 


Lack of excitement 


Eating 


Bud 


Vickery 


Playing football 


Lil 


Oral reports 


With George 


Sweetie 


Oral reports 


Homelessons are done 


Freda 


Oral topics 


With Peter 


Ruffy 


Forgetting things 


Eating 


Jackie 


Donovan 


Three in a model A 


Frenchy 


Her nickname 


Dancing with ? 


Salami 


Oral topics 


Dancing 


Winkie 


Giggling girls 


Dancing with Johnnie 


Larry 


The Army 


Playing football 


Scotty 


High heels and socks 


Billy steers the ship 


Dick 


Rising early 


Tank is full of gas 


Rosie 


Tests 


Bowling 


Bob 


Rationing 


Eating 


Susie 


Wearing glasses 


Homework is done 


Spal 


Riding on an empty tank 


He gets some gas 


Stevie 


Writing poetry 


Eating steak 


Margie 


Writing poetry 


Drawing 


Sub 


The draft 


In Quincy 


T. S. 


High school socialites 


Dancing 


Tav 


His middle name 


At leisure 


Skeets 


Oral topics 


Eating 


Vicki 


Richmond 


Participating in sports 


Wacky 


Randall 


With Lorraine 


Bet 


Rm. 104 attendance slip 


Heartthrob is around 




Having to do the dishes 


Studying aviation 




(c^uoth ^Jke OSard 



Miss Iris Albertini 

"Not stepping o'er the bounds of modesty. 



Mrs. Helen Bagnall 

"O, call back yesterday, bid time return." 





Mrs. Louise Bearse 

"Winding up days with toil, and nights with sleep. 



Mrs. Margaret Brown 

"Framed in the prodigality of nature. 





Mrs. Viola Figueiredo 

"The web of life is of a mingled yarn, good and ill together." 



Mrs. Beatrice Garvin 

"// all the year were playing holidays, 
To sport would be as tedious as to work." 




Page 23 




Miss Olive Hey 

"Let's do it after the high Rowan fashion. 




Miss Beatrice Hunt 

"Here will we sit and let sweet 
Sounds of music creep in our ears." 



Miss Jeannette Jacques 




"Well said; that was laid on with a trowel." 



Miss Helen Johnson 

"Brevity is the soul of wit. 





Miss Lydia Judd 

"Come, give us a taste of your quality.' 



Miss Elizabeth Kelly 

"A still and quiet conscience. 








JfWM 



Miss Katherine Lang 

"For I am nothing if not critical. 



Page 2U 




Miss Nellie Locklin 

"High erected thoughts seated in the heart of courtesy." 



I 



Mr. Edgar J. Mongan 

' //" you can look into the seeds of time, 
And say which grain will grow, and which will not.'" 



Mr. Theodore Packard 

"Shut up 
In measureless content." 




w~—.j^ a 



■Lftfe 



Miss Amy Rafter 

"These most brisk and giddy-paced times." 



\ 









Mrs. Miriam Raymond 

"/ would the gods had made thee poetical." 



Mr. Mario Romano 

"I shall not look upon his like again." 




r 

*J ^- -^ 

ill 



Mr. Louis Rudolph 

"These violent delights have violent ends." 



Page 25 




Mr. Richard Smiley 

"To leave this keen encounter of our wits." 



Mrs. Alice Urann 

"Her voice was ever soft." 
Gentle, and low, — an excellent thing in a woman." 



Mrs. Amelia Vincent 

"Bid me discourse; I will enchant thine ear. 






Miss Margie Wilber 

"Age cannot wither her, nor custom stale 
Her infinite variety." 



Mr. Claiborne Young 

"The play's the thing 



Mrs. Marion Longever 

"One that excels the quirk of blazoning pens. 




Mrs. Ruth Bailey 

"Order gave each thing view. 





Page 26 



^J~wm V fear and ^J~t 



ar 

This year many of our classmates, who in ordinary times would be 
graduating with us, are now serving in the armed forces. Many of these 
boys are already overseas; others are training in this country. We think 
it fitting to have, in place of Alumni Notes, excerpts from letters of former 
members of the Class of Nineteen Forty-five. 

At present I am stationed at a base in South America. The heat is 
intense, and the country abounds with snakes, alligators, monkeys, baboons, 
and millions of annoying insects. 

For recreation we climb the hills, go swimming and fishing, pick 
many varieties of fruit, and have ourselves a time knocking cocoanuts 
down from the palm trees. 

We have a pet monkey named "Skipper" that has thoroughly learned 
the art of pocket picking. He loves to go horseback riding and, when we 
do take him with us, we have to keep an eye on him because he likes to 
beat the horse and these horses are pretty wild. 

I appreciate the interest the school has taken in me and wish to 
thank all. 

Joseph Santos Sl/C 

South America 

I don't believe any of you will ever be able to realize how much 
those of us out here wish we were back graduating with you. But of 
course there is a war to be fought, and you people back home wish you 
could be part of the team out here doing the fighting. I realize it because 
I was once one of you and I wished it, too. 

Jack Estey 
South Pacific 

Our ship, the "Miami", has participated in the bombardment of the 
Palau Islands and the Marianas. We were in the supporting group in 
the occuption of the Marianas, Palau, Leyte, and Luzon. We have had 
several air raids by the Japs but never been hit or suffered a single 
casualty. 

Arthur Freeman S 1/C 

South Pacific 

I have been transferred to the Pacific Fleet and I soon hope to meet 
some of my friends out here. It certainly will be a thrill to meet some 
one from home so far away in a strange land. I would like to extend my 
best wishes to the entire graduating class of 1945. 

Leno Atti F 3/C 

South Pacific 

Page 27 



It's pretty tough to make P. A. C. now ; in fact, it's almost impossible. 
We had our classification tests about four weeks ago, and I qualified for 
Radio Operator Mechanic Gunner in a B-26 or B-29. 

Well, here is the schedule that I have for one day. First, we get up 
at 4 :30 A. M., clean our barracks, and I mean clean them. At seven o'clock 
the day starts with two hours of drill, then dinner time. After dinner 
I have two hours of lecture, such as map reading, and then radio study; 
then after another physical training period and another lecture we have 
chow. At six o'clock I have off until nine, unless I get some kind of detail, 
which we all usually do. 

Pvt. Richard Balboni 
Keesler Field, Mississippi 



^lass J^)ona 



PRAYER FOR PEACE 

We bow our heads in solemn prayer 
That each may have his proper share 
Of God's protecting arm and shield. 
For when the tumult and the shout 
Of conflict die, a faith devoid 
Remains for humble men to ivield. 

Our task will be benevolent: 

To soothe men's minds and thus prevent 

The thoughts of fear that they have known, 

Of blood and sweat, distress and toil. 

In blazing heat, on lonely soil, 

With inner strength from God alone. 

May generations yet to rise 
Be freed of horrors from the skies, 
And days be tranquil as of yore 
With happiness beyond compare. 
O God on high, fulfill our prayer: 
Help us restore the peace once more. 

Barbara Stevens 
Page 28 



OSest Ljln L^ltl. 



izen 



Again a senior class has named its Best Girl Citizen. For the past 
nine years the National Society Daughters of the American Revolution 
has invited public high schools throughout the country to do this, and in 
Plymouth High School the Class of 1945 chose Barbara Hall as the girl 
most outstanding in dependability, service, leadership, and patriotism. 

Sports have always been important among Barbara's extra-curricular 
activities. She played on the first teams of both basketball and hockey 
during her Junior and Senior years. As a member of the Ensemble and 
the Girls' Glee Club, she has been a participant in many musical programs. 
She was also the Vice-President of the Student Activities Society in her 
Junior year. 

Barbara has shown her interest in the literary field by serving on 
the Sophomore Features Committee of "Till Victory," and as Editor in- 
Chief of the 1945 Year Book. Having been elected to membership in the 
National Honor Society in her Junior Year, Barbara has been a Junior 
member of the Plymouth Woman's Club. 

As the last year of our high school days draws to a close, the Class 
of '45 is confident that it has made a wise decision in its choice of Barbara 
Hall as its Best Girl Citizen. 



Mary Lea Pioppi 



AMERICAN HERITAGE 

Rolling plains, lofty heights, 

Rivers broad, valleys wide, 

Teeming cities, quiet towns, 

Farms at harvest, mill wheels turning 

Are the structure of my homeland. 

Roads that stretch like ribbons wide, 
Across the land from shore to shore, 
With their constant stream of traffic 
Over bridge, under mountains 
Are the sinews of my country. 

Men at work, men at play, 
Kin of mine, friends of yours, 
Authors, farmers, men of science, 
Teachers, laborers, doctors, priests 
Build the bloodstream of my nation. 

Love of neighbor, care for poor, 
Constant striving for improvement, 
Freedom of religious worship, 
Liberty for all the people 
Mold the spirit of America. 

Structure, muscle, blood and spirit! 
Out of these was built my country — 
But without true love quite worthless. 
In the breast of every citizen 
Beats the heart of my America! 

Mary Lea Pioppi 



Page SO 



School ^alendc 



SEPTEMBER 

Tues. 12 The Plymouth High School Press Club met and elected its 
officers for the school year with Mrs. Louise Bearse as faculty 
adviser. 

Tues. 19 Roy Randall, president of the S. A. S., called the first assem- 
bly to explain to the school the functions of the Student Activi- 
ties Society and the method by which officers, board, and coun- 
cil members are elected. 

Tues. 19 The S. A. S. under the leadership of Miss Nellie Locklin de- 
cided that the sale of defense stamps should begin on Sep- 
tember 27. At the same time the new jeep campaign will be 
started. The goal of this drive is fixed at $4,950, the cost of a 
flying jeep and a field ambulance. 

Sat. 22 With "Dutch" Morini and Roy Randall as co-captains, the 
1944 football squad played its first game against Abington. 

Tues. 26 Today the members of the school were privileged to listen to 
four members of the Army Air Corps who spoke to pupils 
concerning requirements, training, and opportunities for ser- 
vice in the A. A. F. 

OCTOBER 

Thurs. 5 The school enjoyed a "March of Time" film on Canada, the 
first in a series of eight such films to be shown here. 

Tues. 10 With President Joseph Dietlin presiding, the Senior Class 
held its first meeting, at which plans for a dance were dis- 
cussed. 

Mon. 16 The girls' hockey team played its opening game of the season 
with Middleboro. 

Mon. 23 I n an assembly sponsored by the S. A. S., the school listened 
to Mr. Charles W. Copp, an American who has taught in Japan 
for twenty-one years. He related many enlightening and in- 
teresting facts concerning the country and its people. 

Fri. 27 The Senior Class held its annual dance this evening, and all 
who attended spent an enjoyable evening dancing to the music 
of Carlo David's orchestra. 

NOVEMBER 

Thurs. 2 An impressive commemorative ceremony was held in honor 
of the late Mr. Wayne M. Shipman, a beloved former principal 
of this school. An address by the Reverend Carl Knudsen and 
a dedicatory speech by Francis Tavernelli were delivered to 
the students and the many friends of Mr. Shipman who were 
present. 

Fri. 10 An Armistice Day assembly program, comprised of literary 
selections of prose and poetry describing the spirit of our 
country from the Revolutionary Days of 1776 to the present 

Page 31 



world struggle, was presented to the school by a group of 
students most of whom have brothers in the service. The 
program was under the direction of Mrs. Louise Bearse. 

Thurs. 16 A "March of Time" film on Brazil was shown to the school, 
as well as a film depicting the tragic story of Lidice, a mining 
village in Czechoslovakia which was obliterated by the Ger- 
mans. Captain LeBaron Briggs of the A. A. F. told the school 
of his experiences in the various countries he has visited dur- 
ing the past few months. 

Mon. 20 Mr. R. G. Harrigan of the American Red Cross spoke to the 
school concerning the work of the Red Cross at home and 
abroad. 

Wed. 22 The traditional Parent's Night was held in order to promote 
closer cooperation between the parents in the home and the 
teachers at school. 

Tues. 28 Mrs. Marion Longever concluded her duties at P. H. S. where 
for the past three and a half years she has served as secretary. 
She was well remembered by the school staff and the student 
body who showered her with many gifts. She will be replaced 
by Mrs. Ruth Bailey. 

Wed. 29 Three war films of vital interest to all were shown to students. 
They portrayed the invasion of the Normandy beaches, the 
attack and occupation of Cherbourg, and the liberation of 
Paris. 

DECEMBER 

Fri. 1 At the Jeep Dance held to promote sales in the Jeep Cam- 

paign, pupils bought stamps to the amount of $122.90. 

Wed. 6 The school has gone victoriously over the top in the campaign 
to purchase a flying jeep and a field ambulance. 

Thurs. 14 The students of P. H. S. were given a battery of guidance 

Fri. 15 tests by two Boston University professors to determine their 
various aptitudes and interests. 

Fri. 22 This year a program intended to evoke the Christmas mood 
and spirit was prepared by the Fifth Period Girls' English 
Division under the supervision of Mrs. Miriam Raymond with 
Joanne Calzolari as general chairman. Each girl accepted 
responsibility on some committee, and the entire group ap- 
peared on the program as a speaking choir. Their selections 
included "The Christmas Story", "Hark! The Herald Angels 
Sing", and "I Heard The Bells". Carols were sung by the 
ensemble on the stage and the glee club in the balcony directed 
by Miss Beatrice Hunt. They were accompanied by a trio — 
Mrs. Amelia Vincent, violin; Mrs. Roland Holmes, cel'o; and 
Miss Nellie Locklin, piano. The Christmas words and music 
were presented against a very effective Nativity Scene. Mem- 
bers of the art classes including Dorothy Durant, Doris FiUion, 
Dolores Ghidoni, Barbara Holmes, Mary Allen Manion Mar- 
jorie Stevens, and Bette Lee Watterson are deserving of special 

Page 32 




mention for their work under the supervsion of Mrs. Margaret 
Brown. The figures in the background came to life in an 
impressive tableau which concluded the program. The follow- 
ing took part in the tableau : 

Joseph Norman Fabri 

Mary Gloria Costa 

f Pauline Zanello 

Angels < ^ , 

i Barbara Sawyer 

Robert Diegoli 

Shepherds ' ■< Wallace Dudley 

i Palma Pederzani 

Ivan Richmond 

Wise Men I Robert Brenner 

John Agnone 

Fri. 22 This evening the girls' hockey team, the cheer leaders, and 
the boys' football team sponsored a Sports Dance at which 
Coach Louis Rudolph announced that John Banker had been 
chosen captain of next year's football squad. 

JANUARY 
Tues. 2 Students again returned to school after the Christmas holidays 

and resumed their studies with renewed energy. 
Thurs. 11 Because of a threatened epidemic of scarlet fever, P. H. S. 

and all other Plymouth schools had an enforced vacation of 

two and a half weeks. 

FEBRUARY 
Tues. 6 Mr. Edgar Mongan announced that Barbara Hall had been 
awarded the honor of being chosen the Best Girl Citizen of 
the senior class. 

Page 33 



Wed. 21 The birthdays of Washington and Lincoln were celebrated at 
an assembly presented to the school under the direction of 
Miss Iris Albertini. George Martin acted as narrator and 
the program included charades, several recitations, two songs 
by the glee club, and the performance of "Skip To My Lou" 
and the minuet. 

MARCH 

Tues. 20 The S. A. S. presented to the school Mr. William Hacker, a 
pianist, who demonstrated the various styles in musical com- 
position. 

Thurs. 22 Coach Jeoffrey Nunez made awards to ten basketball boys, 
commented upon the season just completed, and announced 
that James Butters has been chosen next year's captain. 

Tues. 27 The new members of the National Honor Society were an- 
nounced at a special assembly. From the senior class Herbert 
Mitchell, Eleanor Ruffini, and Ann Dugan were chosen; from 
the junior class, Kenneth Telfer, Richard Correa, Raymond 
Girard, Hilda Belcher, Marjorie Radcliffe, Catherine Brigida, 
and Ruth Van Amburgh. The initiation ceremony was con- 
ducted by Francis Tavernelli and participated in by Margaret 
Brewster, Barbara Hall, Dorothy Moskos, Mary Lea Pioppi, 
and Royal Randall. 

Thurs. 29 The students saw a "March of Time" film, "The French Cam- 
paign", which described events in France from its seizure by 
the Germans to its liberation by the Allies. 

Fri. 30 Another "March of Time" film was shown, this one on South 
Africa. 




SENIOR TEN-CENT-A-WEEK COLLECTORS 

Front Row: Janet Perkins, Herbert Mitchell, Marjorie Knight 

Second Row: Mr. Mario Romano, Robert Bastoni, Francis Tavernelli, William DiStefano 

Page 3U 



qAs We Once Were 





>i(A 




jLtMcolutwn 

September, 1944 

The ensemble was again organized under the di- 
rection of Miss Beatrice Hunt with three new members 
to replace graduates. Sopranos — Pauline Armstrong, 
Barbara Hall, and Katherine Palches ; second sopranos 
— Ruth Vickery, Mary Manion, and Virginia Marois; 
Altos — Mary Lea Pioppi, Eleanor Ruffini, and Hilda 
Belcher, with Eileen Collari as accompanist. 

November 21, 1944 

In its first appearance of the year the glee club, band, ensemble, and 

violin quartet took part in the Thanksgiving Assembly. 

December 19, 1944 

The ensemble entertained the Rotary Club at a meeting which was 
held at the Plymouth Rock House. The girls received high praise for their 
program. 

December 22, 1944 

The glee club and ensemble participated in the Christmas Assembly. 
The student body joined in the singing, and thoroughly enjoyed the as- 
sembly. 

December 22, 1944 

The ensemble went to Camp Edwards to sing Christmas Carols for 
the soldiers in the hospital. 

January 30, 1945 

A most enjoyable day was spent at Bridgewater Teachers' College by 
the ensemble. They were guests of the students at a luncheon, and in the 
afternoon took part in group singing and country dancing. 

February 8, 1945 

* W A1 the Reunion of St. Peter's Church the ensemble 

J^M^ sang "Old King Cole", "The Morning Now Beckons", 

j^fc*^VA and "The May Day Carol" before an appreciative 

<: i f^, audience. 

February 21, 1945 

At the combination George Washington and Abraham Lincoln As- 
sembly the glee club sang "The Girl I Left Behind" and "Tenting Tonight." 

March 21, 1945 

The glee club sang at a celebration of International Day at the Ply- 
mouth Woman's Club. 

March 23, 1945 

The ensemble presented an Easter program at the Congregational 
Church. Margaret Donovan acted as narrator, and the ensemble provided 
the music. 

Page 36 



Cy rid iron f\eui 




euiew 

Under the watchful guidance 
of Coachehs Louis Rudolph and 
Mario Romano, the football squad 
began training vigorously for its 
first game, only two weeks away. 
With only one session of body con- 
tact because of the late arrival of 
helmets, Plymouth entered the 
game against Abington very much 
the underdog. The outcome was not 
entirely unexpected. Abington was 
the victor by a score of 31-7. How- 
ever, the new gridsters in the line gained much experience, which proved 
to be helpful in the coming games. The outstanding players were Richard 
Morini and Richard Balboni in the backfield, and Ivan Richmond and Ken- 
neth Telfer in the line. 

The next game was at home against Rockland, an evenly-matched 
contest all the way through. As the final whistle blew, Rockland was 
ahead 12-7. Long runs were made by Richard Morini and Richard Balboni, 
but an equal amount of credit for good performance should be given to 
the line which held Rockland for seven downs on Plymouth's one-yard line. 

The team then journeyed to Middleboro. Again Plymouth lost by a 
score of 12-19 to an adversary that had been undefeated and unscored^ 
upon in its first two games. The first Plymouth touchdown was made by 
Richard Morini on a twenty-yard run through the center of the line. The 
other came when Richard Balboni intercepted a Middleboro pass on Ply- 
mouth's three-yard line, and then raced ninety-seven yards behind good 
blocking by the whole team. In this game James Butters, Plymouth center, 
sustained a fractured wrist which forced him to discontinue football. 

Playing against a much larger and heavier Milton Academy, Plymouth 
went down to its fourth straight defeat to the tune of 26-0. 

Then Plymouth was beaten by Braintree on its home grounds. The 
valiant Plymouth line held the visitors to only one touchdown for three 
periods, and opened holes for the Plymouth backs to make possible long 
runs by Richard Morini and Robert Roncarati. These, in turn, set up 
Plymouth's touchdown on a one-yard buck by Roy Randall. In the last 
few minutes of play Braintree scored on a pass to defeat Plymouth 13-6. 

Plymouth then journeyed to Whitman. In a bitterly-contested game 
Richard Morini ran thirty yards for the touchdown that gave Plymouth 
its first win. 

This taste of victory gave Plymouth new life, and the following week 
the team defeated Barnstable 6-0. 

With the offense finally clicking, Plymouth travelled to Quincy, a 
three to one underdog. North Quincy fans, however, were soon biting their 

Page 37 




Page 38 



•C^ rN^ ^ ' <\* ^^ \, ^ 



.V 



fingernails and wailing in fear, for, as the half ended, Plymouth was lead- 
ing 14-7. But in the second half North Quincy pushed over one touchdown on 
a sustained drive from its own thirty-five yard line, and a little later ran 
back an intercepted pass to gain a 21-14 victory. The entire Plymouth 
team should be accorded the highest praise for its performance in this 
game. Outweighed by at least twenty pounds a man, the little giants held 
big North Quincy until the very last three minutes of play before accepting 
defeat. 

In the last game of the season, Plymouth beat Bridgewater 13-6, with 
the honors again going to Richard Morini. As a reward for his hard work 
and fine spirit, Co-Captain "Dutch" Morini was given honorable mention 
on the New England All-Scholastic Football Team. 

SCHEDULE 
Opponent P. H. S. 

Abington 31 7 

Rockland 12 7 

Middleboro 19 12 

Milton Academy 26 

Braintree 13 6 

Whitman 6 

Barnstable 6 

North Quincy 21 14 

Bridgewater 6 13 

^Jke 05ackboara 

W/TTH only one veteran of last year's championship team, Plymouth 

High completed another basketball season with a record of five vic- 
tories and seven losses. 

Plymouth won its first two games from Duxbury and Kingston, and 
then dropped a close one to a strong Rock- 
land team. 

From the next four games Plymouth 
emerged with the lower scores, being de- 
feated twice by Fairhaven, once by Whit- 
man, and once by Coyle High of Taunton. 

In the next contest Plymouth scored 
an upset by defeating a highly-touted 
Abington quintet on its home court. 

Two more games, one with North 
Quincy and another with Middleboro, were 
chalked up in the lost column. Then Ply- 
mouth concluded its schedule with victories 
over Kingston and Middleboro. 

The basketball boys wish to express 
to Coach Geoffrey Nunez their very deep 
thanks for his teaching, and gratitude for 
his unswerving faith in them. 





Boys' Basketball Captain and Coach 

Robert McCosh and 
Mr. Jeffrey Nunez 

Page 30 



SOUTH SHORE TOURNAMENT 

At the conclusion of the regular season, Plymouth prepared for the 
annual South Shore Tournament. At an earlier date drawings had been 
made, and for its first game Plymouth drew Stoughton. Paced by Cap- 
tain Bob McCosh, who scored ten out of eleven points in the first quarter, 
Plymouth won 35-11. 

The next game proved a real test for the Shiretown players. Plymouth 
struggled hard against a classy Oliver Ames team for a 28-27 victory. 

In the third and final game of the tournament, Plymouth lost to 

Abington. All through the game neither team was ever ahead by more 

than four points. In the last few seconds of the game a basket by John 

Lopes was nullified, and Abington froze the ball to gain victory and the 

championship by a 28-27 score. 

BASKETBALL SCHEDULE 

Opponents P. H. S. 

Kingston 25 30 

Rockland 34 29 

Fairhaven 65 38 

Whitman 28 26 

Fairhaven 35 32 

Coyle 44 34 

Abington 31 32 

Whitman 4 50 

Coyle 42 25 

No. Quincy 42 21 

Middleboro 39 35 

Kingston 20 21 

Mdddleboro 35 41 

444 414 
BROCKTON TOURNAMENT 

Stoughton — Quarter-finals 11 35 

Oliver Ames — Semi-finals 27 28 

Abington — Finals 28 27 

66 90 




BOYS' BASKETBALL 

Front Row: Richard Buttner, George Martin, Robert Roncarati, Robert McCosh, Robert 

Bastoni, Roy Randall, Norman Clark 
Second Row: Coach Jeffrey Nunez, Richard Correa, Robert Dupuis, Melvin Klasky, 

Wallace Dudley, Harold Govoni, Robert Mills, John Lopes, Jr., Richard Burgess 

Page 1+0 



C^A^V Pl^TO^PV 




HONOR GROUP 



Front Row: Margaret Brewster, Robert Hutchinson, Barbara Hall, Francis Tavernelli, 

R ji vhnvji ^Stevens 
Second Row: Althea St. Onge, Dorothy Moskos, Roy Randall, Eleanor Ruffini, Ann 

Dueran, Mrs. Miriam Raymond . 

Third Row: Mary Lea Pioppi, Dorothy Forniciari, Marie Southwell, Dorothy Durant, 

Marv Salmi, Helen Marinos, Norma Anderson 

J Page 41 




^J^rockeij ^hrlakuqkts 

CUCH enthusiasm was displayed this year 

^^^L when about thirty girls reported for 

1^. J practice that the school was able to have 

J** | first and second team games with several 

other schools. 

The season began with a scrimmage 
with Marshfield, as a result of which Ply- 
mouth was able to eliminate some of its 
weaknesses. 

The first scheduled game was played 
,; '■ with Middleboro, Louise Poirier making 

the only goal. 

Kingston suffered defeats in both its 
games with Plymouth. These conflicts were 
exciting because of the long-standing riv- 
alry between the schools. 

The first time the team clashed with 

Gir,S msT k c1ro!yn Ca p P ar; n en an anS 0aCh Scituate, the game proved to be very in- 
Eleanor Ruffini teresting, as for several years now that 

team has been a South Shore champion. However, the teams were evenly 
matched and the game ended in a 0-0 score. 

The second time Plymouth met Middleboro, the Plymouth girls were 
once more victorious. Again the only goal was made by Louise Poirier. 

In the second conflict with Scituate the spectators were greatly ex- 
cited as both teams were trying to maintain their undefeated and unscored- 
upon records. Marjorie Knight was one of the outstanding players in the 
game which ended with the score tied at 1-1. 

Then came the game with Hingham, which was one of the most difficult 
of the season. Although the team fought hard to remain undefeated, it 
was beaten in both its games with this school. 

The season ended with a bewildering game with the football team in 
which the boys were defeated 1-0. 

The girls' hockey team is grateful to its coach, Miss Carolyn Parren, 

for the training which she gave, and to Eleanor Ruffini for her leadership 

as captain. 

HOCKEY SCORES 
Opponents P. H. S. 

Kingston 2 

Middleboro 1 

Scituate 

Kingston 2 

Middleboro 1 

Scituate 1 1 

Hingham 2 

Hingham 1 

Football Team 1 

Pa 9 e 42 Total — A ~7 




GIRLS' HOCKEY 

Front Row: Ruth Ellis, Elaine Girard, Marjorie Knight, Barbara Hall, Eleanor Ruffini, 

Ruth Vickery, Ann Dugan, Norma Scotti, Mary Allen Manion 
Second Row: Claire LaForest, Hilda Belcher, Dorothy English, Catherine Brigida, 

Louise Poirier, Harriet DeFelice, Barbara Gunther, Bello Pedro, Harriet Douglas, 

Gertrude Alves, Barbara Holmes 
Third Row: Ann Stratton, Priscilla Ellis, Shirley Haire, Dolores Tassinari, Pauline 

Ruffini, Alice Dugan, Marjorie Nickerson. Janet Perkins, Betty Ann Beaton 











GIRLS' BASKETBALL 

Front Row: Marjorie Knight, Barbara Hall, Eleanor Ruffini, Ruth Vickery, Ann Dugan, 

Norma Scotti 
Second Row: Ruth Ellis, Elaine Girard, Palma Pederzani, Alfreda Roncarati, Margaret 

Brewster, Patricia Dugan, Mary Allen Manion 
Third Row: Thelma Sylvia, Bella Pedro, Ruth Gordon, Janet Perkins, Helen Mai-inos, 

Dorothy Armstrong 

Page US 



WfHEN school closed in January because of the threatened scarlet fever 

epidemic, basketball practice was delayed for two weeks, but, once 
organized, the team went to work enthusiastically. 

A holiday game was played with an Alumnae team composed of some 
of the school's very recent graduates who, although they were defeated, 
provided more than a little competition for the undergraduates. 

The first game was played at Middleboro, and there the home team 
suffered its only defeat of the year by a margin of six points. 

Throughout the entire game with Hingham, Plymouth remained in 
the lead, the final score being 13-9. 

In the second game with Middleboro, both teams played a hard-fought 
game, and the Middleboro team was defeated by three points. 

At Hingham Plymouth was again victorious, with "Midge" Knight 
as high scorer for the home team. 

The season closed with a fast game with Kingston, whiclh resulted 
in a victory for Plymouth by a score of 25-11. 

The team greatly appreciates the interest and instruction given it 

by the coach, Miss Carolyn Parren. 

SCORES 

Opponent P. H. S. 

Alumnae 23 28 

Middleboro 21 15 

Hingham 9 13 

Middleboro 17 20 

Hingham 17 26 

Kingston 11 25 

Totals 98 127 

9*$ P* 9f I m P 




CHEER LEADERS 

Arlene O'Brien, Betty Ann Bearhope, Eleanor Ruffini, Barbara Hall, Althea St. Onge, 
Marjorie Knight 

Page UU 




GIRLS' ENSEMBLE 

Front Row: Pauline Armstrong, Barbara Hall, Miss Beatrice Hunt, Ruth Vickery, 

Mary Lea Pioppi 
Second Row: Virginia Marois, Katherine Palches, Eleanor Ruffini, Eileen Codlari, Mary 

Allen Manion, Hilda Belcher 



mess 



wU 



Always 

1. Calculating 

2. Willing to accept 

3. Thinking about Quincy 

4. Passing it along 

5. An ungodly laugh 

6. Doodling in room 304 

7. Dreaming of the nights 

8. Inviting them in 

9. Shoving around the coach 

10. Being escorted home 

11. Keeping quiet 

12. Getting an earful 

13. Plenty of gas and girls 

14. Dreaming of Class Night 

15. Buying pipe tobacco 

16. Looking for a good physics 

mark 

17. Looking for gas 

18. Praising the hockey team 

19. Willing to go places 

20. Wanting to go places 

21. Doing that extra bit 

22. Passing it along 

23. Helping Mrs. Urann 

24. Dating Dick 

25. Repairing his own shoes 



Ejaculation 

You Dog ! ! 

Ye gads, no! 

You yopak! 

No kidding! 

Well, what do you say? 

Nuts! 

Hubba! Hubba! 

Don't do that! 

Porta mi gual! 

A cheer for the team ! 

How about a push? 

Oh, for heavens sake! 

Bing, Bing Dio! 

Where's my Ten-cents-a- 

week book? 
Angelina 

What a beast! 

Wait till graduation! 

Oh, crumb! 

You guys, not me! 

Well, what do you expect? 

Take it easy! 

Oh, you funny boy! 

Like heck ! 

Ye gads! 

Horns! 



A Flash In 

Chemistry lab 

Cheerleading 

Theo's Packard 

Spilling the beans 

Pressing the duds 

Blue Chevrolet 

Basketball 

A bathing suit on the beach 

Heckling Mr. Young 

Sweater 

The Green Hornet 

A sailor-driven Mercury 

Football 

Hockey 

Walking around town 

Dancing 

Driving Jordan's truck 

A Plymouth coupe 

Fixing auto bodies 

Creating party signs 

Speechmaking 

Her long blond hair 

Smith's stockroom 

Red 

Gaucho boots 



Page U6 




Photography Dept. 

Whenever there is any excitement, Elston Bartlett is on the spot 
ready with his camera. It is certainly fortunate that he is, or we should 
have to do without his numerous and interesting displays of snapshots. 

Curiosity Dept. 

For what possible reason have many Junior girls been attracted to 
Room 102 during spare moments and study periods? Is it that the fem- 
inine sex is thirsting for a deeper knowledge of chemistry? 

Jollymates Dept. 

When unusual tranquility reigns, among others there are always Enzo, 
George, Irving, or Melvin to mar it. Although there are some who at times 
do not at first fully appreciate their jollity, they cannot resist smiling for 
long. 

Football Dept. 

The Juniors are certainly proud of the boys who played this year 
on the football team. Among these grid stars are George Martin, Arthur 
Shaw, John Banker, Herbert Kearsley, Kenneth Telfer, and Henry Ferrari. 

Anticipation Dept. 

With the congratulations being expressed to John Banker on his 
election to the captaincy of the '45 football squad goes the hope that he 
will lead a championship team. 

Basketball Dept. 

During the basketball games this year the Junior stars have certainly 
been visible. Names? There are Captain Robert McCosh, Harold Govoni, 
John Lopes, James Butters, and Wallace Dudley, an impressive number. 

Fragrance Dept. 

The day on which the chemistry students experimented with hydro- 
gen sulfide was known to all in the school, as the distinct odor of rotten 
eggs spread very rapidly through the lower corridors to the upper floors. 

Hockey Dept. 

As members of the hockey team sped down the field this season, the 
Junior girls, Louise Poirier and Barbara Gunther, were especially helpful 
in assisting the team to victory. 

Latin Dept. 

This year's Latin students have been struggling with the orations of 
Cicero as have others in years gone by. However, those who sympathize 

Page 47 



with Cicero's troubles with Catiline are few, while there are many who 
would frankly favor an earlier assassination. 

International Relations Dept. 

The pupils of the first and second period English classes became 
acquainted with their friends in Belgium and the Belgian Congo because 
they had to do research work for an essay contest. Two books were 
awarded, one to Lillian Parker and one to Marjorie Radcliffe, although 
as yet no one has received the postwar round-trip ticket to Belgium which 
was advertised for the two best essays entered in the contest. 

Poultry Dept. 

There he goes again ! Someone has mentioned chickens to Francis 
Verre. There seems to be nothing that this expert does not know about 
his hobby. 

Presidency Dept. 

From Carver comes the Junior class president, Kenneth Telfer, who 
certainly deserves mention on this page. A salute to his town for sending 
us such a fine leader ! 

The Lone Girl Dept. 

Noticeable among the members of the first period Machines class 
is the presence of one girl seated at the front desk. Upon further investi- 
gation it proves to be Lillian Parker, a resident of Plympton. 
Rhythm Dept. 

A salute to our two rhythm makers, Reginald Correa and Robert 
Querze, who contribute to the school definitely pleasing clarinet music. 




STAMP COLLECTORS 

Front Row: Elaine Girard, Mary Lea Pioppi, Margaret Brewster, Ruth Viekery, Mary 

Allen Manion. 
Second Row: Ruth Gordon, Nancy Montanari, Barbara Holmes, Mrs. Alice Urann, Ann 

Dugan, Dorothy Durant, Delia Cadorette. 
Third Row: Herbert Mitchell, Robert Hutchinson, Joseph Dietlin, Robert Slade, Levi 

Monteiro 

Page 48 




MEMORY BOOK STAFF 
Front Row: Lois Caswell, Elaine Girard, Robert Hutchinson, Mary Lea Pioppi, Barbara 

Hall, Mrs. Miriam Raymond, Robert Silva, Marjorie Knight, Mary Allen Manion, 

Dorothy Durant 
Second Row: Norma Anderson, Barbara Holmes, Ruth Gordon, Margaret Brewster, 

Margaret Donovan, Eleanor Ruffini, Ruth Vickery, Ann Dugan, Patricia Dugan, 

Marjorie Radcliffe, Pauline Armstrong, Hilda Belcher 
Third Row: William DiStefano, Joseph Quinlan, Sumner Stratton, Elston Bartlett, 

Enzo Monti, Roy Randall, Charles Matthewson 




STUDENT ACTIVITIES SOCIETY 
Front Row: Ruth Kessler, Hilda Belcher, Marjorie Knight, Mrs. Alice Urann, Miss 

Nellie Locklin, Mr. Theodore Packard, Roy Randall, Herbert Kearsley, Mary Lea 

Pioppi, Eleanor Sampson 
Second Row: Charles Matthewson, Robert Dupuis, Louis Pederzani, Richard Morini, 

Catherine Baratta, Eleanor Ruffini, Ann Dugan, Eva Paoletti, John Banker, Robert 

Querze, Henry Ferrari, James Butters 
Third Row: Francis Tavernelli, Norma Fabri, Robert Bastoni, James Lamborghini, 

Ivan Richmond, George Martin, Donald Raymond, Joseph Dietlin, Elston Bartlett, 

Raymond Girard, Kenneth Teller 

Page UO 



JUNIOR 

CLASS 

OFFICERS 

Front Row: 

Kenneth Telfer, 
John Banker 
Second Row: 

Pauline Zanello, 
Miss Elizabeth 
Kelly, Dexter Mc- 
Neil' 




SOPHOMORE 

CLASS 

OFFICERS 

Front Row: 

Donald Raymond 
Louis Pederzani 
Second Row : 
Eva P a o 1 e 1 1 i 
Thomas Lindros 
Miss Margie Wil 
ber 



Page 50 



Wise and ^jrootlsk S^oph 



owioms 



Our presence in High School is not resented: 
Both the wise and the foolish are represented. 

To those whose names are on this page: 
Please don't succumb to a fit of rage. 

These verses are written all in fun — 
So don't interrupt, once I've begun. 



&s@.o m<$ 




Louis can't be called a shirker: 
Everyone rates him a faithful worker. 

Never once did we repent 
That we chose him president. 

The other officers helped him prove 
That sophomores are on the move. 



Our football players lack no gumption: 
Blow a whistle, and watch them function. 

Roncarati is by far 

The topmost sophoynore football star. 

Harney, Young, and Lamborghini, 
McKcnna, Gaspar, and Pederzini 

Kicked and tackled, blocked and ran 
To excite each eager football fan. 

"Ready for Football — Weighs Seventy-eight" , 
Headlines in the Old Colony state. 

Hoivard Silva is that lad, 
Watch him tackle he's not bad. 



■?©»"<* ■^so? 




Others practised so they might be 
Next year perhaps on the varsity. 

When we're in the mood for wit and jest 
We always seek Katy, for she's the best. 

"Where will she be? Where is she now?" 
If you can guess, then take a boiv! 




Remember the "Tortoise and the Hare?" 
Crowell and Young are such a pair. 

One's too slow, the other too fast: 

But they're good friends, despite contrast. 

Mary Janeiro, there's no denial 

Is the little gal with the great big smile. 



Jfcjtf 



Carlo David and his "solid-senders" 

Are Plymouth High's pet music blenders. 

Included in our class so far 

Are three of that famous orchestra. 

When Besegai took up his horn, 
A second Harry James was born. 

That lively band and its musical strains 
Were heartily welcomed at basketba'l games. 

Since I have proved my first contention, 
No further cases need I mention. 

For I don't believe in long goodbyes 
That bore the mind arid tire the eyes. 







Page 51 






In the Long Run 



You and your friends will prize the portrait 

that looks like you — your truest self, free 

from stage effects and little conceits. 

It is in this "long run" photography that 

PURDY success has been won. 

Portraiture by the camera that one cannot 

laugh at or cry over in later years. 

For present pleasure and future pride protect 

your photographic self by having PURDY 

make the oortraits. 



• • 



PURDY 

160 TREMONT STREET, BOSTON 

Official Photographers to 
Plymouth High School Class 1945 

• • • 
SPECIAL RATES TO P. H. S. STUDENTS 



Page 52 



Best Wishes 

to the 

Graduating Class 

of '45 




BUTTNER 



COMPANY 



Page 53 



Nook Farm Dairy 




MILK 



and 



CREAM 



HEALTH BUILDER 



LOCAL MILK 



Taste the difference from a modern dairy 



Try Our Flavored Drinks 



CHOCOLATE ORANGE 



COFFEE 



Nook Road 



PLYMOUTH 



Telephone: Plymouth 1261 



Page 54 



Like to help a Doctor?, 



A Medical Secretary Has an Important 
Role in an interesting Profession 

Members of the medical profession and 
others require secretaries who have had 
specialized training. Often the secretary 
without special training cannot handle 
duties peculiar to a professional office. 

The Fisher School has prepared hun- 
dreds of young women for the exacting 
needs of professions and modern business. 
2-year Medical, Legal, Foreign Trade, 
Radio Secretarial. Also 2-year Executive 
Secretarial, 1-year Stenographic and Fin- 
ishing Secretarial. Successful placement. 
Dormitory. 

Send for illustrated catalog— and learn 
how 7 typical Fisher girls found their 
careers. 



i-islte* SCHOOL 




1 18 Beacon Street, Boston 16, Mass. 
374 Broadway, Winter Hill 45, Mass. 




Buy and Keep on Buying 
WAR SAVINGS BONDS 

THE PLYMOUTH NATIONAL BANK 

PLYMOUTH, MASSACHUSETTS 




Page 55 



Auto Supplies Bicycles 

WESTERN AUTO 
ASSOCIATE STORE 

6 Main Street 
PLYMOUTH, MASS. 

C. F. FOWLER 
(Owner) 

Columbia Records 



Bliss Hardware Co., Inc. 

Plumbing Supplies Fertilizers 

DuPont Paints Garden Tools 

Locksmiths Builders' Hardware 



Frederic A. Bliss 

PLUMBING 

HEATING 

Sheet Metal Work 



Opp. Old Colony Theatre Tel. 825 PLYMOUTH 

JIMS 

RESTAURANT 

Incorporated 

FINE FOODS 

Our Specialty 

7 Main Street Plymouth 

Telephone 1187-W 

To the Class of 1945 

VERY BEST WISHES 

for a 
SUCCESSFUL FUTURE 

OLD COLONY and 
PLYMOUTH 

THEATRES 



Page 56 



SAVE 



WITH 

SAFETY 



AT 

Your 



Mutual 

Savings 



Bank 




Deposits Insured Up to the Full Amount 

PLYMOUTH FIVE CENTS SAVINGS BANK 

PLYMOUTH SAVINGS BANK 



Page 57 



Compliments of 

SAMOSET 
MARKET 



Pepsi - Cola 

Hits the Spot 
Weather it's Cold or 
Weather it's Hot 

— o — 

Drink PEPSI - COLA 

PLYMOUTH BOTTLING WORKS, INC. 
Phone 1623-W 124 Sandwich Street 

PRIMO'S SERVICE STA. 

PRIMO ZUCCHELLI 

Tel. Plymouth 79 

CORNER OF SANDWICH AND SOUTH STREETS 

PLYMOUTH, MASS. 

THE BEST FRAPPES IN TOWN 

SUNDAES CAN'T BE BEAT 
PLENTY OF GOOD POP - CORN 

THE MANHATTAN GROCERY 

GEORGE D. MAYERS, Prop. 

Telephone 106-8 
58 SANDWICH ST. PLYMOUTH 



Page 58 



Elmer E. Avery 
Insurance Agency 

INC. 
Est. Since 1905 

16 Main St. Plymouth 

Tel. 166-W 
FIRE 

LIABILITY 

ACCIDENT Insurance 

AUTOMOBILE Surety Bonds 



Good Quality at Just Prices 

KNIFE'S 

GROCERIES MEATS 

VEGETABLES 

FRUITS 

298 Court St. Plymouth 

Telephone 1286 



Plymouth 8C Brockton 
Street Railway Co. 

RIDE OUR MODERN 
AIR-CONDITIONED BUSES 



Sandwich St. 



Plymouth 



SILVIO LEONARDI 

PIONEER 
FOOD STORE 

298 Court St. Plymouth 

Telephone 53 



C. PAUL 

For Your 

SHOES and REPAIRING 

Honest Values 
Dependable Service 



53 Court St. 



Plymouth 



Compliments of 



PEOPLE'S 
MARKET 



16 Market St. 



Plymouth 



THE VIOLIN SHOP 



— of 



ROGER S. KELLEN 



MARVELLI'S 



NEWS STAND 



299 Court St. 



No. Plymouth 



Page 59 



DR. WILLIAM O. DYER 



BILLY WALSH'S MARKET 

The Home of 

Refrigerative Vegetables 

Tel. 1259 54 COURT ST. 

VERRE'S 
BARBER SHOP 

Hours 8 a. m to 8 p. m. 
52 Sandwich St PLYMOUTH 



DR. A. L. DOUGLAS 



DR. E. HAROLD DONOVAN 



PLYMOUTH SUPPLY CO. 

Plumbing — Heating 

Paint and Hardware Supplies 

Tel. 1423 39 COURT ST. 

If it's New and Smart you'll find it at 

SYLVIA'S MILLINERY SHOP 

(Former location of Children's Shop) 
18 COURT ST. PLYMOUTH 

DEXTER'S SHOE STORE 

Footwear for 

THE ENTIRE FAMILY 

Tel. 165-W 16 Court St. 



C LOU GH'S 

The Complete 
Food Market 



Tel. 459 



84 Summer St. 



G AMBINI'S 

Air-Conditioned 

LUNCHEONETTE 



Tel. 372 



52 Main St. 



RUTH MORGAN, M. A. 

Educational Advisor 

751 Little Building 

Boston, Massachusetts 

Liberty 7171 

No service charge to client 



LEWIS' 

Drygoods, Wallpapers 

Kyanize Paints 



13 COURT ST. 



PLYMOUTH 



Compliments of 

GRAY, THE CLEANER 



Phone 406 

Hours Every Afternoon Except Wednesday 
1:30 to 5:00 

DR. FRANK L. BAILEY 

OPTOMETRIST 
Russell BIdg. Plymouth 



STEIN'S 
FURNITURE STORE 

Tel. 679 
291-295 COURT ST. PLYMOUTH 



CASTLE MOTORS 

U. BORGHESANI 
118 SANDWICH ST. PLYMOUTH 



Page 60 



Compliments of 

EDES MANUFACTURING CO 



Clothes for All Occasions 

SPORT COATS SUITS 

SPORT SLACKS WHITE FLANNELS 

SWEATERS SHIRTS 

TIES HOSIERY 

MORSE & SHERMAN 

WM. J. SHARKEY 

Court Street PLYMOUTH 



SRDOW'S 

yashion (enler 



Shows the newest in 
Misses' and Women's Wear 



CAPPANNARI BROS. 



Page 61 



Donovan & Sullivan 

ENGRAVING COMPANY 

Official Engraver for Plymouth High School 

1938 - 1939 - 1940 - 1941 - 1942 - 1943 - 1944 - 1945 



PHOTO-ENGRAVERS 



470 Atlantic Avenue Harbor Building 

Liberty 8711 
BOSTON, MASS. 



Represented by 

P. V. CARTER, Pembroke, Mass. 
Tel. Bryantville 326-13 



Page 62 



Best Wishes to the Class of '45 

BAILEY MOTOR SALES, Inc. 

Telephone 1090 

114 Sandwich Street Plymouth, Mass. 

BUICK and PONTIAC Sales and Service 

G.M.C. TRUCK Sales and Service 

A reliable place to trade . . . One of the best-equipped 

service stations in the vicinity . . . Agents for 

Delco Batteries and United States Tires. 



Don't Forget: All of Our Repair Work is Guaranteed 



BEST WISHES 



from 



ARTHUR L. ELLIS 8c CO., Inc. 



Manufacturers 



"Cape Cod" Curtains 



PLYMOUTH, MASS. 



Page 63 



PETROLEUM SALES and SERVICE, Inc. 

Agents for 

Filtered Range and Fuel Oils White Flash Gasoline 

Atlantic High Film Strength Motor Oils 

HEDGE ROAD PLYMOUTH 

Telephone Plymouth 1499 



PLYMOUTH LUMBER CO 

Building Materials 

OF ALL KINDS 
Telephone 237 



Compliments of 

L. KNIFE 8C SON 

E. CAVICCHI and SONS 
Fruit and Produce 

296 Court Street Tel. 1190 NO. PLYMOUTH 

Page 6U 



PLYMOUTH CO-OPERATIVE FEDERAL 
SAVINGS AND LOAN ASSOCIATION 

Organized 1882 Federalized 1937 

A. PERRY RICHARDS ROBERT J. TUBBS 

President Vice-President and Treasurer 

WALDER J. ENGSTROM 
Secretary and Asst. Treasurer 



Serving the Community for Over 62 Years 

AS A 

Mutual Thrift and Home Mortgage Lending Institution 

ASSETS, #3,300,000. 

Make This YOUR Headquarters for 

Insured Savings 
Home Mortgage Financing 

INFORMATION AND SERVICE ON 

HOME LOANS UNDER G. I. BILL OF RIGHTS 
PURCHASE OF U. S. WAR SAVINGS BONDS 

"REGISTER CHECKS" 

AMERICAN EXPRESS TRAVELERS CHEQUES 

44 Main Street Plymouth, Mass. 

Tel. 324 



Page 65 



WHITNEY SHIRTS MALLORY HATS 

PLYMOUTH MEN'S SHOP 

WILLIAM CAVICCHI, Proprietor 

Telephone 341 18 Main Street 

MANHATTAN SHIRTS LEOPOLD MORSE CLOTHES 

Enna Jettick Shoes Little Sudent Shoes 

For Children 

EDDIE'S SHOE STORE 

E. HAND, Proprietor 

18 Main Street Tel. 158 PLYMOUTH 

THE FAMILY SHOE STORE 

A-Z Comfort Shoes A-Z Comfort Slippers 

JOHN E. JORDAN CO. 

Your Hardware Store for 120 Years 

PAINT — HOUSEHOLD APPLIANCES — HARDWARE 

PLUMBING and HEATING SUPPLIES 

1 Main Street Plymouth 

Telephone 283 

ALPHONSO'S AUTO BODY 

ALPHONSO CHIARI, Proprietor 

BEAR WHEEL ALIGNMENT 
Save Your Tires Drive Carefully 

5 1 SAMOSET STREET PLYMOUTH, MASS. 

Telephone 300-W 
Page 66 



STEVENS ... the fio 



Jflurorra far All ©rrastmtfl 



Member of the 
Florist Telegraph Delivery Association 



Nine Court Street 



nst 



BEST WISHES 




PLYMOUTH 

MACHINE AND BURNER 

CORPORATION 



Page 67 



Best Wishes 


WALK-OVER 

SHOE STORE 


TAVERNELLFS 

Barber Shop 


Agents for 

Walk-Over Shoes 

Bass Moccasins Kamp Tramps 

Arnold and Stetson Shoes 

Physical Culture Shoes 

Hill and Dale Shoes 


Opposite Buick Garage 


D. W. BESSE, Proprietor 
65 Main St. Plymouth 


SIBLEY'S 
SHOE STORE 

Exclusive Agents in Plymouth for 

AIR-STEP Shoes for Women 

ROBLEE Shoes for Men 

BUSTER BROWN SHOES for 

Boys and Girls 

If It's New, It's at Sibley's 
11 Court Street 


H. A. BRADFORD 

Distributor for 

S. S. PIERCE 
SPECIALTIES 

1 Warren Ave. Plymouth 

Telephone 1298-W 


BANDER'S 


Congratulations — Class of 1945 


Plymouth's Most Popular 
Shop for 


WALTER S. PEARSON 


MISSES AND WOMEN 

54 Main St. Pymouth 


JEWELER 


Tel. 38 


62 Court St. Plymouth 


DUNLAP 


Mitchell - Thomas Co. 


Oil Service 


INC. 


GULF PETROLEUM 


FURNITURE 




WALLPAPER —PAINTS 


Service Station 

Tel. 1278 23 Sandwich St. 


66 Court St. Plymouth 



Page 68 



For the Graduation Gift, give a 

fine WATCH or RING 

We carry a complete line of Nationally-Advertised Watches 

BULOVA, BENRUS, ELGIN, GRUEN, HAMILTON, WITTNAUER, 
WALTHAM and LONGINES 

Friendship and Birthstone Rings Pen and Pencil Sets 

IDENTIFICATION BRACELETS TIE AND COLLAR SETS BILLFOLDS 

LOCKETS, CROSSES, BRACELETS. ROSARIES, TOILET SETS 



mr 



-JEWELRY\ /COMPANY 

15 Main Street PLYMOUTH 

Telephone 65 



SCUDDER 

COAL and OIL CO. 

JOHN J. ALSHEIMER, Inc. 
FAMOUS 

READING ANTHRACITE 

PLYMOUTH, MASS. 



Page 69 



THOMAS R. HOGAN 

Formerly 

Cushings 



BEST WISHES TO THE 
GRADUATING CLASS 



PLYMOUTH COUNTY ELECTRIC CO. 

PLYMOUTH, MASS. 

Compliments of 

W. T. GRANT CO. 

2 Court St., Plymouth 
GEORGE V. BUTTNER STORE 

Plymouth's Most Modern Store 

For Ladies, Misses and Children 
Featuring SPORTSWEAR 

"That Distinctive Store of Plymouth" 
19-21 Court St. Telephone 290 

Page 70 





CECCARELLI 






Custom Tailors 




CLEANSERS FURRIERS 




We operate our own Cleansing Plant on Premises 






We call for and deliver 




301 


COURT ST. Tel. 941 NO. PLYMOUTH 




CANTONI 






COAL and OIL CO. 






"blue coal" dealer 




Tel 


ephone 1233-R HEDGE 


ROAD 




Compliments of 






VOLTA RECORD SHOP 






BEST WISHES TO 






CLASS OF 1945 






PURITAN CLOTHING CO. 






Plymouth" s Modern Store 






For Men and Boys 




56 


MAIN STREET PYMOUTH, 


MASS. 



Page 71 



CROWELL'S 


Elizabeth M. Foster 


Furnishings 


BEAUTY SHOP 


— for — 


Room 10 Buttner Buildng 


WOMEN and CHILDREN 


PLYMOUTH 


Stoddard 8C Talbot 

Insurance That Insures 


PLYMOUTH ROCK 


36 Main St. Plymouth 


HARDWARE CO. 


Tel. 30 




Fire — Automobile — Plate Glass 


62 Court St. Plymouth 


Burglary and All Other Types 
of Insurance. 


Telephone 950 


CONTENTE'S 




SHOE STORE 


SHERMAN'S 


Shoes for All the Family 

Better Shoes for Less Money 


PLYMOUTH 


Tel. 733-W 301 Court St. 


NORTH PLYMOUTH 


NORTH PLYMOUTH 




Compliments of 

Henry's Furniture Co. 


SOUTH CENTRE 
MARKET 


40 Court Street 




PLYMOUTH, MASS. 


9 MARKET ST. 


Tel. 1118 HENRY BUSI, Prop. 


Tel. 400 Tel. 1670 



Page 72 



Best Wishes of 


KAY'S 


Forest Drug Store 


Cut-Rate 

Lowest Prices in Town 


22 Court St. Plymouth 


PATENT MEDICINES 
COSMETICS 


Telephone 358 


67 Main St. Corner North 


MARIO'S GARAGE 


TOWN BROOK 

Service Station 


General 


Lubrication Vulcanizing 


Car Repairing 


REPAIRING 




24-Hour Service 


120 Sandwich St. Plymouth 


Telephone 820-W 


McLELLAN'S 




Quality Merchandise 


COLONIAL 


at Low Prices 


DINER 


PLYMOUTH 




We put new life in old shoes 


Laundry Service 


Plymouth 


Convenient — Economical 


Shoe Hospital 


fflib (Enlutti| Smmtury 


63 Yi Main St. Plymouth 


Tel. 272 Howland St. 



Page 73 



BEST WISHES TO ALL OF YOU 


FROM ALL OF US 




Jack and ] 


Smployees 


of the 


Puritan Tailoring Dept. 


Hope for an Early Victory 


Brockton Business College 


An All Out Effort Will Help 


A Good School for Over 50 Years 


Ben R. Resnick Co. 


Intensive Courses Start July 2 




G. E. BIGELOW, Principal 


Telephone 698 


226 Main St. Brockton, Mass. 


Cor. Summer and High Streets 


Telephone 635 


CURRIER'S 


Balboni's Drug Store 


RESTAURANT 


JOSEPH BALBONI, Reg. Pharm. 


and 

ICE CREAM SHOP 




WHITMAN and KEMP PRODUCTS 


317 Court Street 


63 Main St. Plymouth 


PLYMOUTH, MASS. 


Very Best Wishes to the 
Class of '45 


The Cooper Drug Co. 

SHIRLEY SQUARE 


Knight's Service Station 


Drugs and Prescriptions 


109 Sandwich St. 




Tel. 1547-W Plymouth 


TOWN SQUARE 



Page 7U 



Compliments of 


SEARS FUEL CO. 




Coke — COAL — Charcoal 


MIDDLE STREET 


Range and Fuel Oil 




Tel. 1214-W 


GARAGE 


Lothrop St. Plymouth 


Compliments from 


ZANELLO 


THE 


FURNITURE CO. 

Quality Furniture 


PILGRIM TAP 


Upholstering Bedding 




Norge — Gibson — Crosley Refrigerators 


Market St. Plymouth, Mass. 


Tel. 1485 84 Court St. 


CRANSHAW'S 






LORING'S 


Radio Service — Recording Service 
Sound Amplification 


Jewelers 


56 Court St. Tel. 975 


28 Main St. Plymouth 


Cape Insurance Agency 




Amedeo V. Sgarzi Orfeo H. Sgarzi 
Enrico Ferrari 




Insurance for Everything Insurable 


Compliments of 


4 Court St. Plymouth, Mass. 


MAROIS MARKET 


Telephone 66 





Page 75 



DR. JOSEPH W. WILD 
DR. GEORGE S. WILD 

OPTOMETRISTS 

12 Main Street Plymouth 

Tel. 658 

GOODING'S 

Diamonds, Watches, Silverware 
Expert Watch and Jewelry Repairing 

Plymouth's Leading Jewelry Store 

for 140 years. 

4 Main St. Tel. 429 Plymouth 

LEONORE'S 
BEAUTY SALON 

46 Main St. Plymouth 

Teleohpne 1116-W 



WOOD'S FISH MARKET 

Telephone 261 
MAIN ST. EXT. PLYMOUTH 



WILLIAM DiMARZIO 
Insurance 

1 COURT ST. PLYMOUTH, MASS. 

Phone Plymouth 440; Res. 1582 



Compliments of 

ALVES SHOE STORE 

Tel. 441 303 COURT ST. 

SARACCA'S 
NEWS STAND 



36 SANDWICH ST. 



PLYMOUTH 



THE ROGERS PRINT 

Designers and Producers of 

Preferred Printing 

20 MIDDLE ST. PLYMOUTH, MASS. 



BUY BONDS FOR VICTORY 
Drink HOOD'S MILK for HEALTH 









KEY TO WHO? 






1. 


Robert Hutchinson 


10. 


Barbara Hall 


19. 


Joseph Dietlin 


2. 


Betty Bearhope 


11. 


Roy Randall 


20. 


Jacqueline Ryan 


3. 


Sumner Stratton 


12. 


Mary Manion 


21. 


Francis Tavernelli 


4. 


Elaine Girard 


13. 


Richard Morini 


22. 


Janet Perkins 


5. 


Harry Hanson 


14. 


Marjorie Knight 


23. 


Herbert Mitchell 


6. 


Ruth Ellis 


15. 


Dwight Boudreau 


24. 


Delia Cadorette 


7. 


Robert Bastoni 


16. 


Althea St. Onge 


25. 


Alfred Guerra 


8. 


Dorothy Moskos 


17. 


Robert Brenner 






9. 


Levi Monteiro 


18. 


Ruth Vickery 










Key to AS WE ONCE WERE 




1. 


Marjorie Knight 


8. 


Janet Perkins 


15. 


Rose Sitta 


2. 


Sumner Stratton 


9. 


Joseph Quinlan 


16. 


Mary Allen Manion 


3. 


Robert Brenner 


10. 


Marjorie Stevens 


17. 


Dalton Dearborn 


4. 


Althea St. Onge 


11. 


Eleanor Ruffini 


18. 


Barbara Hall 


5. 


Eleanor Sampson 


12. 


Herbert Mitchell 


19. 


Beverly Feci 


6 


Mary Allen Manion 


13. 


Ruth Gordon 


20. 


Elaine Girard 


7. 


Mary Allen Manion 


14. 


Delia Cadorette 







Note: It was not the intention of the editor to print more than one picture of the 
same person. From those submitted the engraver chose the pictures which would 
reproduce best — and the editor neglected to see to it that he selectd only one of 
each senior. 

We hope that our readers will do unto our advertisers 
as they have done unto us. 



Page 76 



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